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Refugees Fleeing
Sorious with a group of refugees fleeing from Darfur

  LIVING WITH REFUGEES
(US ver. SURVIVING SUDAN)
1 hr, 2004

Insight News TV for CH4 DISPATCHES
Discovery Times, CNNI & CBC


Sorious Samura returns to Africa to uncover the realities of being one of Darfur’s countless refugees on the Sudan-Chad border

Producer/Director
   
       
     
— What the viewers said: "Thank you for opening up my eyes" — "It was emotionally disturbing, so different to see real people up close, struggling with what we take for granted. I held back so many tears. It was truly a moving story" — "An outrage I would like to help, is there a reputable agency to send money for food and medical aid?" —

Nominated for an EMMY (Sept 2006 Outstanding Investigative Journalism - Long Form)

 

Watch the streamed programme (Windows Media Player)
Full quality DVD copies are for sale from Insight News TV
 

 
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Award-winning journalist Sorious Samura set out to become, to all intents and purposes, a refugee. He travelled to Chad to live with a family in a refugee camp for one month. He lived under exactly the same conditions, eating what they ate, drinking what they drank. Sorious built close intimate relationships with the people in this situation sharing their hopes and fears. This film provides a unique insight into what life is really like for a refugee.
               
Adam

Adam has 2 wives, 8 children, no money and all his friends have been murdered. Sorious meets Adam at the Chad/Sudan border where he has been living on handouts - but he's outstayed his welcome. Even though he doesn't know how far it is, he's heading for a UN refugee camp further to the west in Chad. He agrees Sorious can follow his family on this journey


After an epic 3 day journey the family finally reaches the camp, however it isn't what they were expecting. With no food or shelter they are forced to fend for themselves. The only aid and assistance they receive comes from other refugees. We follow the family as they try to make some sort of home for themselves.


Fatme, Adam and their six kids sleep under a small piece of tarpaulin. Fatme, Adams's wife, is a strong, elegant, tough woman who is holding the family together. For Adam, although tough and resolute, the situation is almost too much to bear: "There's no respect for us in our own country and here they treat us like animals."


As we see with Adam and his family the bureaucracy of the aid business sometimes leaves those most vulnerable behind. The UNHCR tell Sorious that "The situation here is a mess." As the film draws to a close Sorious points out that, yet again, situations like this are a damming indictment on all of us. "Too often, too little is done too late."
               
Fatme
               
Refugee Children
         

Links

Insight News TV
CBC News - "How to help" Links

UNHCR Chad/Darfur Emergency
Claudio von Planta - Director & Cameraman
TV Reviews - New York Times
US Council on Foreign Relations discuss Surviving Sudan

               
         


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